AJACM


 


 

2012 Volume 7 Issue 1 Abstracts

Treatment of Neck Pain with Collateral Meridian Acupressure Therapy: A Randomised, Sham-Intervention Controlled Trial (Wong, Yap & Fung)

Emotions, Desires and Physiological Fire in Chinese Medicine, Part One: The Pericardium and Lifegate (Garvey)

Emotions, Desires and Physiological Fire in Chinese Medicine, Part Two: The Minister Fire (Garvey)

(Wong K, Yap B, Fung B K-P). Treatment of Neck Pain with Collateral Meridian Acupressure Therapy: A Randomised, Sham-Intervention Controlled Trial. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(1):10-15.

Background: Collateral Meridian Acupressure Therapy (CMAT) is a relatively new technique that has been developed to relieve intractable pain. Little research has been, however, conducted to examine its effect on neck pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effect of CMAT on neck pain. Method: In this randomised, sham-intervention control, patient-therapist blind trial, 60 patients who suffered from neck pain and had restricted neck movement were recruited. Participants were randomly allocated into the treatment group (n = 30) and control group (n = 30). CMAT was performed on the treatment group, while the control group received sham treatment. Severities of pain before and after the treatment were measured on a scale of 0 (no pain) to 5 (most severe pain). Chi-square and t-tests were used to analyse categorical and continuous data, respectively. Results: All participants completed the study. Prior to the treatment, there was no group difference in demographic or pain data. After the treatment, the severity of neck pain in the CMAT group (0.7±0.6) was significantly less than that in the control group (2.8±0.9). Conclusion: CMAT may induce an immediate analgesic effect on neck pain. Its long-term effect requires further research.

(Garvey M). Emotions, Desires and Physiological Fire in Chinese Medicine, Part One: The Pericardium and Lifegate. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(1):16-22.
Chinese medicine’s concept of qi mediates between a person’s mental-emotional life and the physiological processes producing and maintaining the body form. The pathogenic potential of human emotions and desires figured prominently in China’s ancient medical and philosophical texts and, more than any other type of qi, the sovereign and minister fire embody the influences and relationships between mental, emotional, sensory and physiological activities. Contemporary traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) textbooks rarely mention the minister fire, except as an illness mechanism that is identified with liver and gall bladder yang repletion patterns. The preferred term for its physiological influences today is the kidney yang qi.

The two parts of this paper examine the physiological and clinical implications of the minister fire. In the Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon commentaries (after c. 100 BCE), minister fire is the complement of the heart’s sovereign fire; in the Treatise on Cold Damage commentaries (after c. 200 CE) it is an emergent property of the lifegate; and in TCM it is equivalent to the kidney yang. When Song-Jin-Yuan (960–1368) medicine revisited the Inner Canon’s division of the fire phase into ‘sovereign’ and ‘minister’, minister fire became a key physiological concept guiding some of China’s lasting medical developments, methods and formulas.

Part One begins with the pericardium and lifegate. Premodern references link the pericardium and lifegate with the minister fire that disseminates the orders of the sovereign fire. Together, the pericardium and lifegate reflect the communication between the heart and kidney visceral systems and disseminate their qi-influences – the pericardium communicating the executive influences of the sovereign fire, and the lifegate producing the physiological influences of the minister fire. The minister fire itself, and the pathogenic stirring of minister fire due to emotions and desires, will be the subject of Part Two.

(Garvey M). Emotions, Desires and Physiological Fire in Chinese Medicine, Part Two: The Minister Fire. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(1):24-30.
Chinese medicine’s concept of qi mediates between a person’s mental-emotional life and the physiological processes producing and maintaining the body form. The pathogenic potential of human emotions and desires figured prominently in China’s ancient medical and philosophical texts, and more than any other type of qi, the sovereign and minister fire embody the influences and relationships between mental, emotional, sensory and physiological activities. When level and calm, the minister fire transmits the lifegate’s original yang qi influences from the lower jiao; the liver, sanjiao and gall bladder (the jueyin and shaoyang) manage its dissemination through the body interior, and its movement between the interior and surface of the body. Contemporary traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) textbooks however rarely mention the minister fire, except as an illness mechanism that is identified with liver and gall bladder yang repletion patterns. The preferred term for its physiological influences today is the kidney yang qi.

The two parts of this paper examine the physiological and clinical implications of the minister fire. Part One began with the heart and kidney (shaoyin) relationship, as reflected in the pericardium and lifegate’s association with the minister fire and their role in communicating the orders of the sovereign fire. In Part Two, the discussion turns to the minister fire’s physiological influences, and the pathogenic stirring of minister fire due to emotions and desires.


Treatment of Neck Pain with Collateral Meridian Acupressure Therapy: A Randomised, Sham-Intervention Controlled Trial (Wong, Yap & Fung)

Emotions, Desires and Physiological Fire in Chinese Medicine, Part One: The Pericardium and Lifegate (Garvey)

Emotions, Desires and Physiological Fire in Chinese Medicine, Part Two: The Minister Fire (Garvey)

(Wong K, Yap B, Fung B K-P). Treatment of Neck Pain with Collateral Meridian Acupressure Therapy: A Randomised, Sham-Intervention Controlled Trial. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(1):10-15.

Background: Collateral Meridian Acupressure Therapy (CMAT) is a relatively new technique that has been developed to relieve intractable pain. Little research has been, however, conducted to examine its effect on neck pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effect of CMAT on neck pain. Method: In this randomised, sham-intervention control, patient-therapist blind trial, 60 patients who suffered from neck pain and had restricted neck movement were recruited. Participants were randomly allocated into the treatment group (n = 30) and control group (n = 30). CMAT was performed on the treatment group, while the control group received sham treatment. Severities of pain before and after the treatment were measured on a scale of 0 (no pain) to 5 (most severe pain). Chi-square and t-tests were used to analyse categorical and continuous data, respectively. Results: All participants completed the study. Prior to the treatment, there was no group difference in demographic or pain data. After the treatment, the severity of neck pain in the CMAT group (0.7±0.6) was significantly less than that in the control group (2.8±0.9). Conclusion: CMAT may induce an immediate analgesic effect on neck pain. Its long-term effect requires further research.

(Garvey M). Emotions, Desires and Physiological Fire in Chinese Medicine, Part One: The Pericardium and Lifegate. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(1):16-22.
Chinese medicine’s concept of qi mediates between a person’s mental-emotional life and the physiological processes producing and maintaining the body form. The pathogenic potential of human emotions and desires figured prominently in China’s ancient medical and philosophical texts and, more than any other type of qi, the sovereign and minister fire embody the influences and relationships between mental, emotional, sensory and physiological activities. Contemporary traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) textbooks rarely mention the minister fire, except as an illness mechanism that is identified with liver and gall bladder yang repletion patterns. The preferred term for its physiological influences today is the kidney yang qi.

The two parts of this paper examine the physiological and clinical implications of the minister fire. In the Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon commentaries (after c. 100 BCE), minister fire is the complement of the heart’s sovereign fire; in the Treatise on Cold Damage commentaries (after c. 200 CE) it is an emergent property of the lifegate; and in TCM it is equivalent to the kidney yang. When Song-Jin-Yuan (960–1368) medicine revisited the Inner Canon’s division of the fire phase into ‘sovereign’ and ‘minister’, minister fire became a key physiological concept guiding some of China’s lasting medical developments, methods and formulas.

Part One begins with the pericardium and lifegate. Premodern references link the pericardium and lifegate with the minister fire that disseminates the orders of the sovereign fire. Together, the pericardium and lifegate reflect the communication between the heart and kidney visceral systems and disseminate their qi-influences – the pericardium communicating the executive influences of the sovereign fire, and the lifegate producing the physiological influences of the minister fire. The minister fire itself, and the pathogenic stirring of minister fire due to emotions and desires, will be the subject of Part Two.

(Garvey M). Emotions, Desires and Physiological Fire in Chinese Medicine, Part Two: The Minister Fire. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(1):24-30.
Chinese medicine’s concept of qi mediates between a person’s mental-emotional life and the physiological processes producing and maintaining the body form. The pathogenic potential of human emotions and desires figured prominently in China’s ancient medical and philosophical texts, and more than any other type of qi, the sovereign and minister fire embody the influences and relationships between mental, emotional, sensory and physiological activities. When level and calm, the minister fire transmits the lifegate’s original yang qi influences from the lower jiao; the liver, sanjiao and gall bladder (the jueyin and shaoyang) manage its dissemination through the body interior, and its movement between the interior and surface of the body. Contemporary traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) textbooks however rarely mention the minister fire, except as an illness mechanism that is identified with liver and gall bladder yang repletion patterns. The preferred term for its physiological influences today is the kidney yang qi.

The two parts of this paper examine the physiological and clinical implications of the minister fire. Part One began with the heart and kidney (shaoyin) relationship, as reflected in the pericardium and lifegate’s association with the minister fire and their role in communicating the orders of the sovereign fire. In Part Two, the discussion turns to the minister fire’s physiological influences, and the pathogenic stirring of minister fire due to emotions and desires.